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1.03.2014

Sugar on Snow (Maple Toffee)



Every Spring, sometime between the end of March and the beginning of April; our sap starts running. For those of you who live in the southern part of the United States, you may be unfamiliar with what "running sap" is. This is the time of year when our temperatures rise above freezing (32 degrees ) and then drop back down at night. Maple trees are "tapped" and the sap is collected. This is then boiled down into maple syrup.



It is a New England tradition that when the "sugar houses" start opening and the sap is being boiled that we prepare "Sugar on Snow".



Sugar on snow is when you take maple syrup and boil it until it reaches a temperature of about 230 degrees. Then drizzle the hot syrup over the top of clean fresh snow. It instantly hardens into maple toffee.



Though it is only January, we have an abundance of fresh clean snow. It is also so cold out I can't send the kids outside to play. I thought it would be the perfect time to teach them some basic candy making skills, and have some fun indoors with snow!




Sugar on Snow:

Ingredients:
  • Baking pan filled with clean fresh snow
  • 3/4-1 1/2 cups maple syrup (Grade B if you can find it) 
Directions:
  1. Place baking pan of snow in the freezer until you are ready for it.
  2. In a sauce pan bring maple syrup to a low boil and continue to cook until it reaches 230 degrees. 
  3. Remove snow from freezer, and drizzle hot maple syrup over snow. 
  4. Allow to cool just a moment, then peel off the snow and eat!   
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21 comments:

  1. Carrie, this is uber cool, and I've never done this, but, oh would I love to! We love maple anything, pinning. ~ Melissa@melissassouthernstylekitchen

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    1. Thanks Melissa! It's a fun treat in the winter, kids love it.

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  2. OMG!!! I have wanted to do this since I was a little girl, after reading Laura Ingalls Wilder. I've thought about doing it with crushed ice since we live in sunny CA. :) This totally makes me nostalgic for my Laura Ingalls!

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    1. Definitely do it with ice! It should work just as well.

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  3. I haven't done this since I was a kid and that was a LONG time ago. My brother and I would tap the trees in the forest behind our house and my mother would boil and boil and boil and when the first big snowstorm would hit Maine... we'd BEG for this. :)

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    1. Maureen... you really should move back to New England ;)

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  4. Well, the temps here in Mid-Coast Maine are now above 0, maybe I'll venture out for some snow! I haven't done this in years!

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    1. I think we just hit 5 degrees here at my home in NH. Slowly warming back up!

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  5. Oh Carrie....being a New England girl at heart, I wish I had thought of this when we had a bunch of snow here in D.C. yesterday! This sweet stuff brought back such great memories! I'd love to be enjoying some of this beautiful toffee today! : )

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    Replies
    1. Next time you get some snow, be sure to boil some syrup down!

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  6. What a cool technique. We sure do have plenty of snow here. I'm going to have to give this recipe a try.

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    1. It's a lot of fun. I hope you try it!

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  7. I remember doing this when I was a kid. .it's was so good...

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  8. I've never heard of doing this before but it looks like such a fun activity & treat for a snowy day!

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  9. Carrie, I loved finding this on your blog! It is my personal feeling that "B" grade syrup is a little to robust in flavor for this wonderful treat. I would recommend a nice medium grade syrup at 232 degrees on a low temp. in a pot with high sides. If it boils up they can add a pinch of butter to knock down the foam. For your readers that live in a city they could also used the crushed ice from their freezer, and enjoy it year round!
    Enjoy,
    Deb Locke
    Sugarmomma's Maple Farm

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    1. It's nice to find a local reading my blog ;) I am a fan of the darker rich syrup flavor when I use B. Though it isn't often.... I can never get my hands on much of it!

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  10. I've wanted to do this since I read Little House on the Prairie as a little girl! Unfortunately the book didn't provide instructions as thorough as yours :) Now we just need to get some snow in Atlanta!

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  11. Live in Vermont we did this as kids and our grandmother always had us take any leftover boiled syrup and stir, stir, stir until it thickens and then pour onto wax paper ~ once fully cooled it becomes yummy maple candy!

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