Page Links

PhotobucketPhotobucket photo Navigation-07_zpsd1f5c3aa.pngPhotobucketPhotobucket
 border=

12.10.2012

Salted Hard Cider Caramels



I am not huge into candy making during the holidays. I tend to leave that to my Nana. She is famous for making huge baskets and tins filled with truffles, chocolate covered cherries, fudge and other Christmas goodies. I dabble in fudge making, maybe make some cookies..... and then there are caramels.

I have seen many recipes for salted caramels and cider caramels in the blog world for a long time now. I've always steered clear of them simply because I hate making anything that calls for a candy thermometer. I go through candy thermometers like you wouldn't believe. I think I buy a new one every single Holiday season. I break them, lose them.... who knows what with them.

This year I was determined to make some candies before I lose the new thermometer. First thing on the docket... make your own caramel candies. But not just any caramels. Woodchuck Hard Cider Caramels! I think it's at the point where I could write a book on recipes using Woodchuck.

These caramels are perfectly soft and chewy. A slight tartness from the boiled cider, but evened out with rich caramel sweetness and a bit of sea salt.



Salted Hard Cider Caramels
(Recipe Adapted from Smitten Kitchen)

Ingredients:

2 cups Woodchuck Hard Cider
1/4 tsp apple pie spice
4 tbs of butter   
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 tbs heavy cream
1 tsp sea salt

Directions:

In a sauce pan add hard cider and bring to a boil. Reduce down 1/4 a cup.

Mix in sugars, butter heavy cream and apple pie spice. Over medium heat bring up to about 252 degrees on your candy thermometer. If you don't own one. Don't fret, to test your caramel have a cup of ice water ready. Dip your spoon in the hot mixture and then immediately into the ice water. When the caramel hardens to the consistency you want in a chewy caramel it is done.

Immediately remove from heat and pour into a parchment paper lined bread pan.

Sprinkle with sea salt and allow to cool until hardened.

With a very sharp buttered knife, cut caramels into 1 inch squares.





 


Photobucket

22 comments:

  1. I just finally made caramels for the first time yesterday, and had so much fun making them! I love the idea of adding the woodchuck cider, I bet they tasted amazing:-) They look delicious! Hugs, Terra

    ReplyDelete
  2. So pretty, love the photos! Any salted? YUM! I think I the baby "needs" one! :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Those look marvelous, Carrie! My husband and his brewing buddies just made their first batch of cider. All I can say is that I think they could learn a thing or two from the Woodchuck folks! lol

    Maybe I can use some of their cider in my own version. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My mom and dad brew their own beer and have now moved onto cider. I can't wait to try it when it's ready. I am HUGE cider fan.

      Delete
  4. Oh wow. These look delicious! I'm also doubtful of making anything with a thermometer. I've tried but I always mess it up. But these are enough to make me want to at least try again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad I'm not alone! The few times I try to make something w/out one I tend to get a sugary grainy mess.

      Delete
  5. These look delicious! I have never attempted candy because of that thermometer...woodchuck cider is enough to tempt anyone though!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Um, this is brilliant! Huge fan of Woodchuck Cider! Can't wait to try this recipe!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I am blown away - I simply adore woodchuck cider but never would have thought to incorporate it into caramel candies. Especially with a little bit of salt. Carrie, this recipe is wonderful and I can't think of a more perfect candy this holiday season. I don't think I'd be able to share these!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I think I just HAVE to make these! So pretty, and I can only imagine how addictive they must be!

    ReplyDelete
  9. A candy thermometer is pretty much the only thing my kitchen is lacking. When I worked at a culinary store last year, thermometers were flying off the shelf from really cute old ladies. I'm tempted to go out and fight the crowds so I can get one now! I love sea salt and caramels!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hard cider caramels are something that comes from my wildest imagination. How brilliant, Carrie!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. These caramels look incredible, love the hard cider!

    ReplyDelete
  12. These sound amazing! I love that you used hard cider. Yum!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Made 4 batches last night with Woodchuck's Winter Cider. It was amazing! If I don't eat it all myself, these will make wonderful Christmas gifts.


    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  14. When you say reduce down 1/4 cup I want to make sure I'm doing this step correctly. I should reduce it down 1/4 of a cup leaving 1 3/4 remaining correct?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What that means is, add the full 2 cups of cider to your pan. As it cooks it will reduce in volume and become a thicker substance. Like a syrup. You cook it down until you only have about 1/4 cup left.

      Delete
  15. I feel so stupid. I read "Reduce down 1/4 a cup" as reduce to 1 3/4 cups. My husband and I even had a debate about it tonight as I attempted to make my fourth batch of this - the first three being failures. This is my first time ever making candy, so I had no basis. This is NOT a recipe for a beginner. I even went out and bought a thermometer thinking I just wasn't getting it up to the right temperature and I was carefully measuring the cider after it had boiled down a bit. I'm attempting to save this batch with more sugar and my next attempt will include boiling down TO 1/4 of a cup, not BY 1/4 of a cup. Hopefully someone else does themselves a favor to read the comments before they start cooking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lisa, I have made this many times with great success as have other readers. Some have even commented on this post saying how much they enjoyed it. I am very sorry yours did not turn out. Candy making can be tricky and this is not a beginner recipe. If you look above your comment I explained the 1/4 cup to another commenter. You add the full amount to your pan, and cook it down to 1/4 cup.

      Delete

I love your comments and any feedback. Please let me know what you think!